Spinster-in-Training

This blog is radfem-positive.

Anonymous asked: There's a post going around saying that leaving Laverne Cox off of the Time 100 Influential People or whatever is an act of violence and erasure and I'm not sure if it's serious or not.... but how is that an act of violence? I can see erasure, yeah, but violence? Why does everything having to do with disagreeing with a transwoman suddenly become "violent"? You're awesome, btw.

appropriately-inappropriate:

It isn’t.

"Violent" is just this week’s buzzword, and one whose use I find particularly egregious.

The trans woman who was beaten to death with rocks in Guadalajara in 2013? Violence.
The Travesi who was murdered by a John in a favela in Rio?
Violence.

Trans women—and especially women of colour—face violence. That’s a fact.

Being left off the Time 100?
NOT violence.

survivorcourier:

"framing of all under age sex workers as trafficked ignores the wider picture and hinders those trying to provide support and other options”

excuse me

you mean

children

children that are being raped

when you talk about “under age sex workers” in your ‘every-day whorephobia’ twitter account

jesus chriiiiiist

(via terfect)

emmaphorisms:

"vagina-havers are always like this :/ this is why I prefer women with penises"

"you’re just a CAFAB so? What does it matter at all what you think lol?"

using buzzwords doesn’t mask your misogyny very well 

(via kameotheturtle)

“Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.”

—   Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery (via hollow-gram)

(via veruca-assault)

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

(via plansfornigel)

“They don’t “accidentally” rape women. They don’t “misread the signals”. Every day, men who pretend that they are incapable of telling that women don’t want them to penetrate their bodies, read hundreds of social signals expertly. They know when to joke about with the boss; when to back down gracefully in a meeting without losing face; when to negotiate hard and when to keep some back for the next deal; they know when to banter with their colleagues and when to be professional. They know when to slap down someone in a pub or a club or on a train and when that would be dangerous – most men, like most women, are very, very good at negotiating social signals.”

The ["Sex"] Buyers' Narratives [Men who purchase the services of prostituting women & their explanations for doing so]:

The Biological Determinism Narrative:

"It should be legalised over here [UK]. This is the way God created us." - (British).

"The people who made this questionnaire [about why men buy women in prostitution] do not understand how strong men's physiological needs are. Men with high spirits have been struggling with their sexual needs every day since they were fifteen years old. Men looking like gentlemen have the same mindset." - (Japanese, media, age 60s).

The 'Men Will Be Men' Narrative:

"It's just a lust for life, a quest for pleasure - there's not many men who are (faithful) you know." - (Australian).

"It's a boys' thing, and you never tell what happens with the boys." - (Australian who never visits a brothel alone).

The 'Women As Scum' Narrative - Getting Off on Humiliation, Degradation, and Violence Against Women:

"I think a lot of them [women in prostitution] are disgusting." - (Dutch).

"At just the right moment I leaned forward and shot my load on her face! Good amount on her lips, cheeks and an eye shot as well! She was surprised [sic] and shocked, this got me more excited than the act. I left her there with nothing to wipe the cum off with and her exclaiming to get something. Yeah right!" - (American, Internet buyers site).

The 'Thrill of Transgression' Narrative:

"Men who want to buy sex aren't deterred by police. The fear adds to the thrill." - (Canadian, business professional, age 40).

"But one of the main reasons I enjoy prostitutes is because I enjoy breaking the law - another reason I don't want brothels made legal. There is a charm about the forbidden that makes it desirable...crime and risk are part of the texture of life...Risk is what separates the good part of life from the tedium." - (British, age 41).

The 'Making My Fantasies Real' Narrative:

"I've been leading up to it; using pornography and looking at various websites. Rather than being a fantasy it was someone you could have sex with." - (British, management consultant, age 40).

"I want my prostitute not to behave like one. I want them to role play to be a pretend girlfriend...She should enjoy her business. I actually want her to be genuinely attracted to me." - (British).

The 'Unsatisfactory Wife, Partner, or Girlfriend' Narrative:

"I was quite elated afterwards. From the sexual side, which was better physically than what I would get at home, and also the conversation with the woman." - (British, IT worker, age 50s).

"I find it hard for her [his wife] to turn me on...and in truth she doesn't want it regularly anyway - but I have developed a sexual feeling for women that look different in some way...exotic beauties." - (Australian).

The 'Having It Both Ways' Narrative:

"The thing which in some ways bothers me the most is my almost boundless capacity to just simply ignore what I have done, and fully plan to do it again." - (British).

"I know I love her [his wife] and I don't want to leave. It's not like I'm having an affair. I've been using the girls at the parlours for over nearly 20 years...It's not really about the person. It is just about a sexual release. My wife is still my best friend." - (Australian).

The 'Service Like Any Other' Narrative:

"I see us as adults. I want to pay and someone wants to sell." - (British, IT worker, age 50s).

"If I am satisfied with what I am buying, then why should I be violent? I will be violent when I am cheated, when I am offered a substandard service...Sometimes [violence] is because the prostitute wants the client to use condoms. They force it on the client...He will naturally be disgruntled, and there will be altercations." - (Indian, bank clerk, age 54).

The 'Traveler's' Narrative:

"Truck driving is not an easy task...We miss our wives...Yet we need comfort." - (Cameroonian, truck driver, 38).

"[It] would be a walk of shame in your own backyard...But when you're on the other side of the world man, who cares?" - (undesignated john).

The 'No Emotional Strings' Narrative:

"I am attracted to prostitutes because there are no emotional entanglements, and I like the idea of sex with different women." - (American, PhD, inventor, philanthropist, age 52).

"No big deal, it's just like getting a beer." - (British).

The 'I Don't Like What I'm Doing, But I Still Do It' Narrative:

"I do not like myself engaging in prostitution. I am selfish in that I cannot live without engaging in prostitution." - (Japanese, public official, age 40s).

"See, I understand that the prostitute is there in the first place because she has no choice...I feel bad about this, especially if she is forced or sold. But the fact is that she is in the flesh market...It may sound bad, but the fact is that she is a commodity offering a service and she should accept that. We should all." - (Indian, civil servant, age 39).

The 'Male Bonding' Narrative:

"You go out for a few beers with your mates after work and then like, someone'll just mention it, 'Let's go get a brass,' 'finish a good night off.' " - (British).

"Here in Australia, we think nothing of going to a strip bar for a business luncheon...It's just something you do with your mates...If you're in the mood for a little lap dance for dessert or want to head off to the VIP room for a quickie, no one really gives a damn." - (Australian).

The 'Easy Option' Narrative:

"After a working day of 8-9 hours, I am not interested in looking for vague company in a bar...It is the easiest option in my life situation for satisfying my sexual needs." - (Finnish, education professional, age 50).

"It's like going to McDonald's; most people are looking for a good quick cheap meal. It's satisfying, it's greasy, and then you get the hell out of there." - (McSex).

The 'Welfare' Narrative:

"These girls gotta eat, don't they? I'm putting bread on their plate. I'm making a contribution. They'd starve to death unless they whored." - (American military, Philippines).

"Maybe it is true. Maybe these women have horrible, depressing lives. If they do and to the extent that they do, I'm a few hours of easy money. I'm a free meal." - (American, sex tourist).

The 'Man as Victim' Narrative:

"How would you feel, waking up the next morning thinking, 'I can't get laid unless I pay for it?' The harm is done to men, too...the women are doing as much harm to the men." - (Canadian, business professional, age 40).

"MEN are the ones being exploited by these whores...While men can control their actions, they cannot control the urge. This leaves men open to abuse and exploitation." - (undesignated john).

Raymond, G. Janice. “Not A Choice, Not A Job:

Exposing the Myths About Prostitution and the Global Sex Trade.” Potomac Books, (p. 40 - 43)

234 girls kidnapped by extremist rebel group Boko Haram in Nigeria.

gynocraticgrrl:

Boko Haram has been abducting some girls and young women in attacks on schools, villages and towns but last week’s mass kidnapping is unprecedented. The extremists use the young women as porters, cooks and sex slaves, according to Nigerian officials.

Boko Haram was on a rampage last week, staging four attacks in three days that began with a massive explosion during rush hour at a busy bus station Monday morning in Abuja, the capital in the center of the country, which killed at least 75 people and wounded 141.

Nigeria’s military and government had claimed to have the militants on the run and contained in a remote northeast corner on the border with Cameroon.

Blogs Becoming anti-RadFem?

prowoman-prochoice:

I keep seeing all of these posts on my feed about all these major political/social blogs or help blogs or whatever becoming more and more hostile towards radical feminists, and I just have to say to everyone:  

PLEASE do not be disturbed by this.  If you need a safe place, if you need someone to talk to about what happened to you, whatever it is, be it any issue, any problem, etc., please do not hesitate to shoot us a message here on PWPC, or even find our personal blogs (mine is aislingetmaya) and message us on or off anon over there.

 We all here at PWPC are always open ears for y’all, so please don’t be disheartened by all of these blogs becoming super anti-radfem.  

-Aisling

Toni Dorsay’s blatant transphobia.

auntyorthodox:

Toni Dorsay is transphobic.

Dorsay uses the slur “truscum” to refer to transsexuals who explain their transition as a means to alleviate their feeling of dysphoria and who contend that dysphoria is a medical component to transsexualism.

Dorsay invented the slur “housie,” inspiration for which Dorsay credits Malcom X for his term “house negro.” Dorsay claims “housies” are “collaborators” trying to prevent transgender people from having civil rights. Dorsay freely uses this term to discredit and disfellowship trans women who are critical of transgender politics.

glaad co-sponsored Dorsay’s Trans 100 event, the nominees for which are carefully vetted to ensure they conform to the overall mission of transgender ideology.

GLAAD: please stop supporting bigotry in our community by ignoring these types of salacious attacks on trans women. The trans community has a long, proud history of supporting iconoclastic thought. Don’t allow bullies like Toni Dorsay to push us out of our own communities.

(via plansfornigel)